“The problem with communication is the illusion that it has been accomplished.”
George Bernard Shaw

We say something, we write something, and we think that because we clearly communicated our thoughts and feelings that the other person has understood us.

Really?

The only way you can know if you communicated successfully is by observing, and then interpreting the response.

If you don’t get a response that indicates understanding, your communication was faulty, or your interpretation of their response was faulty.

This might not be true in every case, but it’s a useful premise. Acting as if it is true means taking responsibility. You cannot ‘blame’ someone else for your communication failing.

Here are 12 premises, including this one about communication, that may not be true, but are useful as working beliefs for a better life.

My best wishes, Paul


By Paul Matthews – Speaker/Author/Expert on Informal Learning and Workforce Capability
Author of new book “Learning Transfer at Work: How to Ensure Training >> Performance
and bestsellers “Capability at Work: How to Solve the Performance Puzzle
and “Informal Learning at Work: How to Boost Performance in Tough Times
Connect with Paul on LinkedIn or see his website at paul-matthews.com